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Sugar Houses

Original Sugar House on east slope of Lovell MTN.

Primarily a homestead through the early 1920's, our Grandparents, Norman and Elsie Fletcher operated a chicken farm and shipped eggs to town during the Great Depression. Norman and his brother, Harry Fletcher, also started a sugaring operation on the eastern slope of Lovell Mountain.

Most of the syrup in the early years was boiled down until it became sugar. This sugar was sold by the pound or traded for equipment or supplies. Later maple syrup was packaged in individual steel containers for retail sales to the local community.

Our Sugaring history

  • A homestead 1920's, our grandparents, Norman and Elsie Fletcher operated a chicken farm during the Great Depression.

  • Norman and his brother, Harry Fletcher, produced maple syrup. He built and operated several sugarhouses in East Washington. The largest sugar bush was on the Eastern slope of Lovell Mountain.

  • The brothers continued sugaring operations on the eastern slope of Lovell Mountain until 1938 when the great hurricane devastated their sugar bush.

  • Norman moved the operation off the Mountain to a sugar bush off of Deer Valley Road near the Bradford town line. This sugarhouse had a separate kitchen as well for finishing and packaging syrup.

  • In the early 1950's, Harry and Norman moved the operation to the Fletcher Family Farm.

  • The last sugarhouse Norman built in 1954 is located across the street from the farmhouse and is still in use today.

Pure maple syrup

  • 5th generation family sugaring operation

    The Fletcher Family Farm Sugar House that was built in 1954 is located across the street from the farmhouse and is still in use today. We have updated the sugaring equipment, added electricity, a canning room and refined the collection process, but the basic sugaring operation remains the same.

  • Annual Yield

    Presently, we produce about 1,200 pounds or 110 gallons of syrup annually. We boil on a 30” wide x 8’ long drop flue evaporator with an airtight front and a forced draft blower. The unit averages about 60 gallons of water evaporation per hour.

 

Annual Open House

  • Free samples

    Each year in New Hampshire, sugar houses state-wide open their doors to the public in individual open houses that demostrate the process of making maple syrup. Fletcher Family Farm gladly participates by offering free samples of maple syrup as well as a nice spread of snacks and food.

  • sleigh rides

    At the Fletcher Family Farm Open House, we also offer draft-horse-drawn sleigh rides through the woods and snow-covered fields that harken back to an earlier day. This time outdoors celebrates our ancestry and gives kids a glipse of the past ... and how to have fun without a cell phone or tablet.

Process

  • Collecting

     

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Boiling

 

Bottling

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